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4"x5.5" Hand Burnished Raku Ikebana Vase,8R19

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4"x5.5" Hand Burnished Raku Ikebana Vase. Exquisite one of a kind piece signed by artist. I have looked far and wide to find a Artist to custom design Raku pottery for Ikebana and display. I am happy to say that I have found one and she has taken the Raku process to its highest degree. The process of Naked Raku is prior to bisque firing, each piece is burnished by rubbing a smooth stone over the surfac to develop the basis of a satin smooth finish. After she bisque fires the burnished piece , she fires it again in a kiln -like container fueled with sawdust. The sawdust is ignited and left to burn for one to two days. The direct contact of the fire and smoke creates unique designs. The introduction of various organic and inorganic materials produces the random flashing of color. When the piece is cooled it is washed and burnished again with wax to creat the warm satin finish. The finished variations are endless, some results look like metal, some wood, others resemble stone or marble. Certain color flashings are more difficult to achieve making them highly desirable. This process, where our artist has some control over the results and nature does the rest, has opened up creative avenues to her that continue to inspire her today. These are one of a kind pieces crafted by our artist. Raku bisque is some what porous we recommend cup Kenzens for your Ikebana arrangment. 8R
Exquisite 3"x9" Raku Lantern. Exquisite one of a kind piece signed by artist. I have looked far and wide to find a Artist to custom design Raku pottery for Ikebana and display. I am happy to say that I have found one and she has taken the Raku process to its highest degree. The process of Naked Raku is prior to bisque firing, each piece is burnished by rubbing a smooth stone over the surfac to develop the basis of a satin smooth finish. After she bisque fires the burnished piece , she fires it again in a kiln -like container fueled with sawdust. The sawdust is ignited and left to burn for one to two days. The direct contact of the fire and smoke creates unique designs. The introduction of various organic and inorganic materials produces the random flashing of color. When the piece is cooled it is washed and burnished again with wax to creat the warm satin finish. The finished variations are endless, some results look like metal, some wood, others resemble stone or marble. Certain color flashings are more difficult to achieve making them highly desirable. This process, where our artist has some control over the results and nature does the rest, has opened up creative avenues to her that continue to inspire her today. These are one of a kind pieces crafted by our artist. Raku bisque is some what porous we recommend cup Kenzens for your Ikebana arrangment. 06raku8
History of Raku Ware
Making of Raku ware was initiated by Ch�jir�, the first generation of the Raku family, during the Momoyama period (1573-1615). At that time three-coloured glazed pottery, san cai ware, based on technology from the Fujian region of China was produced in and around Kyoto. Ch�jir� was presumably familiar with such techniques. A written record confirms that Ameya, Ch�jir�'s father, originally from China, is thought to have been the one who introduced the techniques of three-coloured glazed pottery from China, although none of his works has survived to prove this. These Japanese san cai wares, however, were not called Raku wares. It was only after Ch�jir� had become acquainted with the tea master Sen Riky� (1522-1591) who asked Ch�jir� to make tea bowls for the tea ceremony under his guidance that the Raku ware came into being. It could be said that the origin of Raku ware lay in the making of a single tea bowl for the tea ceremony.
The characteristics of Raku tea bowls as pioneered by Ch�jir� are their exclusive use of monochrome black or red glazes - in marked contrast to the brightness of the san cai wares from which they evolved - and an unique aesthetic which aims at the elimination of movement, decoration and variation of form. In this Raku wares reflect more directly than any other kind of ceramic the ideals of wabicha, the form of tea ceremony based on the aesthetics of wabi advocated by Sen Rikyu. Central to the philosophy of wabicha were notions of "nothingness" deriving from Zen Buddhism and the "isness" of Taoism. Raku wares are hand-formed rather than thrown on the wheel, which makes them very different from other kinds of Japanese ceramics. Hand-forming increase the potential for modelling and allows the spirit of the artist to speak through the finished work with particular directness and intimacy. Ch�jir�, however, through his negation of movement, decoration and variation of form, went beyond the boundaries of individualistic expression and elevated the tea bowl into a manifestation of abstract spirituality.
Ch�jir�'s elimination of movement, decoration and variation of form and his delving beyond the boundaries of individualistic expression manifested themselves in works of monochromatic silence. To deliberately negate attempt at any formative expression is, as if creativity tries to go beyond the act of creation itself, a paradoxical and extraordinary spiritual endeavour. What was Ch�jir� trying to achieve? What are we to understand from his attainments? 400 years later, the issues of spirituality and artistic consciousness addressed by Ch�jir� are as valid and relevant as ever. 8R19

4"x5.5" Hand Burnished Raku Ikebana Vase,8R19

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4"x5.5" Hand Burnished Raku Ikebana Vase. Exquisite one of a kind piece signed by artist. I have looked far and wide to find a Artist to custom design Raku pottery for Ikebana and display. I am happy to say that I have found one and she has taken the Raku process to its highest degree. The process of Naked Raku is prior to bisque firing, each piece is burnished by rubbing a smooth stone over the surfac to develop the basis of a satin smooth finish. After she bisque fires the burnished piece , she fires it again in a kiln -like container fueled with sawdust. The sawdust is ignited and left to burn for one to two days. The direct contact of the fire and smoke creates unique designs. The introduction of various organic and inorganic materials produces the random flashing of color. When the piece is cooled it is washed and burnished again with wax to creat the warm satin finish. The finished variations are endless, some results look like metal, some wood, others resemble stone or marble. Certain color flashings are more difficult to achieve making them highly desirable. This process, where our artist has some control over the results and nature does the rest, has opened up creative avenues to her that continue to inspire her today. These are one of a kind pieces crafted by our artist. Raku bisque is some what porous we recommend cup Kenzens for your Ikebana arrangment. 8R
Exquisite 3"x9" Raku Lantern. Exquisite one of a kind piece signed by artist. I have looked far and wide to find a Artist to custom design Raku pottery for Ikebana and display. I am happy to say that I have found one and she has taken the Raku process to its highest degree. The process of Naked Raku is prior to bisque firing, each piece is burnished by rubbing a smooth stone over the surfac to develop the basis of a satin smooth finish. After she bisque fires the burnished piece , she fires it again in a kiln -like container fueled with sawdust. The sawdust is ignited and left to burn for one to two days. The direct contact of the fire and smoke creates unique designs. The introduction of various organic and inorganic materials produces the random flashing of color. When the piece is cooled it is washed and burnished again with wax to creat the warm satin finish. The finished variations are endless, some results look like metal, some wood, others resemble stone or marble. Certain color flashings are more difficult to achieve making them highly desirable. This process, where our artist has some control over the results and nature does the rest, has opened up creative avenues to her that continue to inspire her today. These are one of a kind pieces crafted by our artist. Raku bisque is some what porous we recommend cup Kenzens for your Ikebana arrangment. 06raku8
History of Raku Ware
Making of Raku ware was initiated by Ch�jir�, the first generation of the Raku family, during the Momoyama period (1573-1615). At that time three-coloured glazed pottery, san cai ware, based on technology from the Fujian region of China was produced in and around Kyoto. Ch�jir� was presumably familiar with such techniques. A written record confirms that Ameya, Ch�jir�'s father, originally from China, is thought to have been the one who introduced the techniques of three-coloured glazed pottery from China, although none of his works has survived to prove this. These Japanese san cai wares, however, were not called Raku wares. It was only after Ch�jir� had become acquainted with the tea master Sen Riky� (1522-1591) who asked Ch�jir� to make tea bowls for the tea ceremony under his guidance that the Raku ware came into being. It could be said that the origin of Raku ware lay in the making of a single tea bowl for the tea ceremony.
The characteristics of Raku tea bowls as pioneered by Ch�jir� are their exclusive use of monochrome black or red glazes - in marked contrast to the brightness of the san cai wares from which they evolved - and an unique aesthetic which aims at the elimination of movement, decoration and variation of form. In this Raku wares reflect more directly than any other kind of ceramic the ideals of wabicha, the form of tea ceremony based on the aesthetics of wabi advocated by Sen Rikyu. Central to the philosophy of wabicha were notions of "nothingness" deriving from Zen Buddhism and the "isness" of Taoism. Raku wares are hand-formed rather than thrown on the wheel, which makes them very different from other kinds of Japanese ceramics. Hand-forming increase the potential for modelling and allows the spirit of the artist to speak through the finished work with particular directness and intimacy. Ch�jir�, however, through his negation of movement, decoration and variation of form, went beyond the boundaries of individualistic expression and elevated the tea bowl into a manifestation of abstract spirituality.
Ch�jir�'s elimination of movement, decoration and variation of form and his delving beyond the boundaries of individualistic expression manifested themselves in works of monochromatic silence. To deliberately negate attempt at any formative expression is, as if creativity tries to go beyond the act of creation itself, a paradoxical and extraordinary spiritual endeavour. What was Ch�jir� trying to achieve? What are we to understand from his attainments? 400 years later, the issues of spirituality and artistic consciousness addressed by Ch�jir� are as valid and relevant as ever. 8R19

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