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16"x8.5"x5.5" Kala Stein Original Ikebana Suiban,6KS1

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Quick Overview

Kala Stein Original Ikebana Suiban. Exquisite one of a kind Ikebana Suiban. I look far and wide to find artist's to custom design unique pottery for Ikebana and display. I am happy to say that I have found one and she has taken the process to its highest degree. After spending some time with her, I believe this artist puts a part of her soul in each pot. 8ks10

Kala Stein / Artist Statement & Resume
In my work I aim for a simple complexity that is celebrated and beautiful. One after another I work to develop my pieces into more graceful, simplified, and abstracted vessel forms. I feel relief by creating objects austere and intimate. They are a break from the clutter and excessiveness that is inherent to our spaces and surroundings. In our society we generally have more than enough; spaces are filled, overfilled, stacked, and piled. On the contrary my pieces are stacked to offer a contemplative space. They are organized in a way I believe serene and gentle, simplified as not to be overwhelming. In my own way I hope to achieve what Garth Clark speaks of in Warren McKenzieメs work, モThis kind of power comes from subtraction, from removing everything that is extraneous until one is left with what can only be described as an essence.ヤ

My work evolves from the process of slip casting multiples, altering, refining, and arranging. My casting body allows for a great deal of manipulation outside the mold, although I primarily cut, shave, and rasp the forms into simple, graceful variations. The vast possibilities in line, form, and gesture are explored in the window of soft to leather hard. Cut, undulating lines give energy to the module-like base forms changing them from bulky masses into dimensional vessels. It is not until the pieces are glazed that they are arranged into infinite scenarios, sculptural compositions, what I call tabletop sculptures. These arrangements allow for the forms to interact within a defined space, promoting a relationship to take place, transforming them from individual vessels into a sculptural set.

The arrangements are harmonious compositions balancing geometric with organic. The quite presence of color or muted texture specifies parts of a whole. The goal is an aesthetically interesting coexistence of line, form, space, and color. Presentation is paramount; often a unifying base or simple tray is used as a platform for forms to interact in or upon. The poetics of these arrangements speak of the balance, contrast, and harmony found in the natural world. Further inspired by the natural world my forms and surfaces suggest the essence of shells, water, landscapes, or the undulating flight path of a songbird.

Through subtleties in form and glaze surfaces I intend to lure the viewer closer to the pieces. As the scale may imply, I encourage that they are approached as functional objects. Now engaged, the viewer becomes the user and is encouraged to interact with the pieces as they are intended to be unstacked, disassembled, assembled and rearranged. This does not destroy the arrangement, but transforms it into another realm of being- into the intimate realm of functionality and physical interaction.

As a child growing up outdoors I was constantly compelled to create. Materials were endless as I used things I found. I made miniature fences from sticks lashed together with grass and piled rocks into cairns decorated with flowers and pinecones. Continuously, I learn how the earth offers not only raw material but also mysterious beauty. In my mind a walk in the woods or the finding of an unusual stone offers an opening for thought and grounds to slow down and appreciate what the moment, or object, has to offer. Parallel in thinking, I hope that my work can offer similar opportunities for contemplation, a calm in the midst of our bustling world. To provide a visual resting place for thoughts beyond the piece itself- the memory of a place visited, the suggestion of a water-polished stone, the outline of a horseメs jaw, or the texture of a weathered antler. As I sit with hand made objects or organic findings time reveals things that at first go unseen. The mystery is stimulating and feeds my interest to continue creating, to contemplate the old, new, and the journey in between.

1997-2002
State University of New York at New Paltz. New Paltz, New York.
Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A) in Ceramics, Minor in Art History. Deans List, Cum Laude.

2007-2009
State University of New York College of Ceramics, Alfred University.
Alfred, New York. Masters of Fine Arts (M.F.A) in Ceramics.

2005-2007
Studio Technician / Teaching Assistant. Ceramics Department at Hollins University. Roanoke, VA.
Apprentice. Donna Polseno & Rick Hensley. Floyd, Virginia.
Assist in the production of slip casted tableware, loading and unloading kilns, clay and glaze making, gallery setup, firing kilns, and all aspects of studio work and general maintenance. Focus on developing my personal aesthetics & concepts in ceramic art.

2006
Studio Assistant. Mold Making with Dan Mehlman. Penland School of Crafts, North Carolina.
Set up studio pre-session, and assisted with class during the two week session.

2005
Studio Assistant/Class with Pete Pinell. Arrowmont School of Crafts, Gatlinburg, Tennessee.
Set up studio pre-session, and assisted with class during the two week session.

2004-2005
Artist in Residence. Cub Creek Foundation. Appomattox, Virginia.
Worked to create a cohesive body of work, aesthetic and conceptual. Contributed to the development of the foundation programs, public relations, publications, and community outreach programs. Organized community wood firings, sales, and built a slide shooting setup.

2004
Visiting Artist. Cape Cod Sea Camp. Brewster, Massachusetts.
Presented and taught two day mold and tile-making workshop to campers.

2003-2004
Ceramist. Moravian Pottery and Tile Works. Doylestown, Penns ylvania.
Worked in all aspects of tile production, trained apprentices, presented process to public, and conducted workshops. Electric kiln repair and maintenance.

Estate Keeper. Springhouse Farm. Quakertown, Pennsylvania.
Grounds and building maintenance for circa 1800 small farm, animal care and gardening.

2003
Artistメs Assistant. Mary Roehm, at the Clay Studioメs Collectorメs Weekend.
University for the Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

2002
Internship. Christian Muller, Minetta Brook, New York, New York.
Interviewed farmers and researched efforts and accomplishments in organic farming and living. Planned sculpture which revealed research in visual form.

Artistメs Assistant. Tim Rowan, Stone Ridge, New York.
Aided in wood firing preparation and firing kilns.

Production Potter. Romig Streeter, Millbrook, New York.
Production of Asian-style table ware, photographic documentation of finished product.

Book Designer for The Philosopherメs Kite. Tal Streeter, Millbrook, New York.
Designed book layout using Quark Express and Photoshop.

Mold Maker. John Williams, Rosendale, New York.
Made large scale plaster press molds.

Teaching Assistant, Field Work in Art. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.
Aided in teaching Basic Ceramics college course. Prepared slide lectures, project planning, demonstrations, critiques, and grading. Assisted students in conceptual and technical aspects of their work.

Student Art Gallery Coordinator. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.
Curated and organized exhibitions, gallery maintenance, and show promotion.

2001-2003
Artistメs Assistant. Rimer Car ydillo, Gardiner, New York.
Assisted in the production of a large scale tile mural to be installed on the exterior of campus building, SUNY New Paltz. Computer imaging for photo-silkscreening, burned silkscreens, printed onto porcelain tile, firing, packaging, and photographic documentation.

2000-2003
Studio Assistant. Michelle Rhodes, Gardiner, New York.
Tested glazes, loaded kilns, mixed clay, overall studio support and organization.

2000-2003
Clay Club President. SUNY New Paltz Ceramics Department, New Paltz, New York.
Organized group trips, activities, weekly meetings, and ceramic sale fundraisers.

Student Art Alliance, Ceramics Representative. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.
Attended weekly meetings, participated in workshops, openings, conferences, and lectures.

2001
Wood and Salt Firing Workshop. Studio Sales Pottery, Michael Carol, Avon, New York.

Teacherメs Assistant. The Mill Art Gallery, Honoyoe Falls, New York.
Taught childrenメs day camp モDrawing in a Natural Environment.ヤ

1997-2000
Work Study Appointments, SUNY New Paltz Art Department. New Paltz, New York.
Metals Department (2000). Monitor of equipment and supply room, in charge of inventory and tool checkout to students.
Sculpture Department (1999). Monitor of equipment and supply room, in charge of inventory and tool checkout to students.
Ceramics Department (1998-1999). Made clay for student use, stocked raw materials, general cleanup and organization of studio.
Photography Department (1997-1998). Monitor of equipment and supply room, in charge of inventory and tool
checkout to students. Mixed and stocked chemicals in color and black and white darkrooms.



2002
Scholarship to attend workshop at Peterメs Valley Craft Center. Layton, New Jersey.

Scholarship to attend workshop at the Womenメs Studio Workshop. Rosendale F, New York.

Ceramic Department Scholarship. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.

Carry Coffing Memorial Scholarship. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.

2000
SUNY New Paltz Alumni Scholarship. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.

Carry Coffing Memorial Scholarship. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.



2007
Strictly Functional, National Juried Exhibition. Lancaster, PA.

Small Works Invitational. The Clay Studio, Philidelphia, PA.

Dinner Plans, a Slow Food Concept-Event. Over the Moon, Floyd, VA.

2006
Annual Tile Festival. Moravian Pottery and Tile Works, Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

From Our Table To Yours. Exhibition, Ferrum College, Ferrum, Virginia.

16 Hands Apprentices. Group Exhibition, Over the Moon Gallery, Floyd, Virginia.

Artizanns Art and Fine Craft Gallery. Naples, New York.

Lost Lake Art and Fine Craft Gallery. Dansville, New York.

2005
Annual Tile Festival. Moravian Pottery and Tile Works, Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

2004
Annual Tile Festival. Moravian Pottery and Tile Works, Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

Eight Fluid Ounces: A Cup Show. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Visiting Artist. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.

2003
Clay Is Not Dirt! Work from the Staff and Apprentices of the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works.
The Medical Healing Arts Center, Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

2002
Finger Lakes Artists Group Exhibition. The Mill Art Gallery, Honoyoe Falls, New York.

Emerging Artists Trio Exhibition. The Living Seed Art Gallery, New Paltz, New York.

B.F.A Thesis Exhibition. Chandler Gallery, SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. New York.

Ceramics Department Exhibition. Smiley Art Gallery, SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. New York.

Ikebana as an art form
Ikebana (ee-kay-bah-nah) is the art of Japanese flower arranging. The object is simply to create something of beauty for the delight of others and, in so doing, improve yourself. The artist sees it as a discipline of the inner spirit for the ultimate purification of the mind and heart. No judging of the work is conducted.
Dating back to the 15th Century, this art form reflects three fundamental characteristics of Japanese thinking: an innate love of nature, an abiding love of line, and an instinctive love of symbolism. For the Japanese, flowers signify communion with the heart of nature.
Through the centuries, ikebana has grown to incorporate 23 leading schools. The first, Ikenobo (15th Century), advocates using the natural bend of branches. This school, together with Sogetsu, Ohara and Misho would be considered the leading schools.
The Sogetsu School has emerged as an exemplary contemporary school whose arrangements fit seamlessly in today's modern and traditional d/cor.
The goal of your arrangement is to create three levels of flowers -- high, medium and low. The highest point should equal twice the width of your container, plus twice the height. The medium level is approximately 3/4 of the highest point, and the lowest point is 3/4 the height of the medium level.
Asymmetry and the use of empty space is an essential feature to composition, so be sure not to clutter the arrangement with too many items.
You can use any type of flower or branch to create your arrangement. But you should never use four of the same flower or branch in a single arrangement.
The tools for the art include a Kenzan (pin frog), Hasami (clippers or scissors without a spring grip), and Hana (fresh flowers). Everything but the fresh flowers are available at Hollow Creek Bonsai. 8KS10

16"x8.5"x5.5" Kala Stein Original Ikebana Suiban,6KS1

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Kala Stein Original Ikebana Suiban. Exquisite one of a kind Ikebana Suiban. I look far and wide to find artist's to custom design unique pottery for Ikebana and display. I am happy to say that I have found one and she has taken the process to its highest degree. After spending some time with her, I believe this artist puts a part of her soul in each pot. 8ks10

Kala Stein / Artist Statement & Resume
In my work I aim for a simple complexity that is celebrated and beautiful. One after another I work to develop my pieces into more graceful, simplified, and abstracted vessel forms. I feel relief by creating objects austere and intimate. They are a break from the clutter and excessiveness that is inherent to our spaces and surroundings. In our society we generally have more than enough; spaces are filled, overfilled, stacked, and piled. On the contrary my pieces are stacked to offer a contemplative space. They are organized in a way I believe serene and gentle, simplified as not to be overwhelming. In my own way I hope to achieve what Garth Clark speaks of in Warren McKenzieメs work, モThis kind of power comes from subtraction, from removing everything that is extraneous until one is left with what can only be described as an essence.ヤ

My work evolves from the process of slip casting multiples, altering, refining, and arranging. My casting body allows for a great deal of manipulation outside the mold, although I primarily cut, shave, and rasp the forms into simple, graceful variations. The vast possibilities in line, form, and gesture are explored in the window of soft to leather hard. Cut, undulating lines give energy to the module-like base forms changing them from bulky masses into dimensional vessels. It is not until the pieces are glazed that they are arranged into infinite scenarios, sculptural compositions, what I call tabletop sculptures. These arrangements allow for the forms to interact within a defined space, promoting a relationship to take place, transforming them from individual vessels into a sculptural set.

The arrangements are harmonious compositions balancing geometric with organic. The quite presence of color or muted texture specifies parts of a whole. The goal is an aesthetically interesting coexistence of line, form, space, and color. Presentation is paramount; often a unifying base or simple tray is used as a platform for forms to interact in or upon. The poetics of these arrangements speak of the balance, contrast, and harmony found in the natural world. Further inspired by the natural world my forms and surfaces suggest the essence of shells, water, landscapes, or the undulating flight path of a songbird.

Through subtleties in form and glaze surfaces I intend to lure the viewer closer to the pieces. As the scale may imply, I encourage that they are approached as functional objects. Now engaged, the viewer becomes the user and is encouraged to interact with the pieces as they are intended to be unstacked, disassembled, assembled and rearranged. This does not destroy the arrangement, but transforms it into another realm of being- into the intimate realm of functionality and physical interaction.

As a child growing up outdoors I was constantly compelled to create. Materials were endless as I used things I found. I made miniature fences from sticks lashed together with grass and piled rocks into cairns decorated with flowers and pinecones. Continuously, I learn how the earth offers not only raw material but also mysterious beauty. In my mind a walk in the woods or the finding of an unusual stone offers an opening for thought and grounds to slow down and appreciate what the moment, or object, has to offer. Parallel in thinking, I hope that my work can offer similar opportunities for contemplation, a calm in the midst of our bustling world. To provide a visual resting place for thoughts beyond the piece itself- the memory of a place visited, the suggestion of a water-polished stone, the outline of a horseメs jaw, or the texture of a weathered antler. As I sit with hand made objects or organic findings time reveals things that at first go unseen. The mystery is stimulating and feeds my interest to continue creating, to contemplate the old, new, and the journey in between.

1997-2002
State University of New York at New Paltz. New Paltz, New York.
Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A) in Ceramics, Minor in Art History. Deans List, Cum Laude.

2007-2009
State University of New York College of Ceramics, Alfred University.
Alfred, New York. Masters of Fine Arts (M.F.A) in Ceramics.

2005-2007
Studio Technician / Teaching Assistant. Ceramics Department at Hollins University. Roanoke, VA.
Apprentice. Donna Polseno & Rick Hensley. Floyd, Virginia.
Assist in the production of slip casted tableware, loading and unloading kilns, clay and glaze making, gallery setup, firing kilns, and all aspects of studio work and general maintenance. Focus on developing my personal aesthetics & concepts in ceramic art.

2006
Studio Assistant. Mold Making with Dan Mehlman. Penland School of Crafts, North Carolina.
Set up studio pre-session, and assisted with class during the two week session.

2005
Studio Assistant/Class with Pete Pinell. Arrowmont School of Crafts, Gatlinburg, Tennessee.
Set up studio pre-session, and assisted with class during the two week session.

2004-2005
Artist in Residence. Cub Creek Foundation. Appomattox, Virginia.
Worked to create a cohesive body of work, aesthetic and conceptual. Contributed to the development of the foundation programs, public relations, publications, and community outreach programs. Organized community wood firings, sales, and built a slide shooting setup.

2004
Visiting Artist. Cape Cod Sea Camp. Brewster, Massachusetts.
Presented and taught two day mold and tile-making workshop to campers.

2003-2004
Ceramist. Moravian Pottery and Tile Works. Doylestown, Penns ylvania.
Worked in all aspects of tile production, trained apprentices, presented process to public, and conducted workshops. Electric kiln repair and maintenance.

Estate Keeper. Springhouse Farm. Quakertown, Pennsylvania.
Grounds and building maintenance for circa 1800 small farm, animal care and gardening.

2003
Artistメs Assistant. Mary Roehm, at the Clay Studioメs Collectorメs Weekend.
University for the Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

2002
Internship. Christian Muller, Minetta Brook, New York, New York.
Interviewed farmers and researched efforts and accomplishments in organic farming and living. Planned sculpture which revealed research in visual form.

Artistメs Assistant. Tim Rowan, Stone Ridge, New York.
Aided in wood firing preparation and firing kilns.

Production Potter. Romig Streeter, Millbrook, New York.
Production of Asian-style table ware, photographic documentation of finished product.

Book Designer for The Philosopherメs Kite. Tal Streeter, Millbrook, New York.
Designed book layout using Quark Express and Photoshop.

Mold Maker. John Williams, Rosendale, New York.
Made large scale plaster press molds.

Teaching Assistant, Field Work in Art. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.
Aided in teaching Basic Ceramics college course. Prepared slide lectures, project planning, demonstrations, critiques, and grading. Assisted students in conceptual and technical aspects of their work.

Student Art Gallery Coordinator. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.
Curated and organized exhibitions, gallery maintenance, and show promotion.

2001-2003
Artistメs Assistant. Rimer Car ydillo, Gardiner, New York.
Assisted in the production of a large scale tile mural to be installed on the exterior of campus building, SUNY New Paltz. Computer imaging for photo-silkscreening, burned silkscreens, printed onto porcelain tile, firing, packaging, and photographic documentation.

2000-2003
Studio Assistant. Michelle Rhodes, Gardiner, New York.
Tested glazes, loaded kilns, mixed clay, overall studio support and organization.

2000-2003
Clay Club President. SUNY New Paltz Ceramics Department, New Paltz, New York.
Organized group trips, activities, weekly meetings, and ceramic sale fundraisers.

Student Art Alliance, Ceramics Representative. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.
Attended weekly meetings, participated in workshops, openings, conferences, and lectures.

2001
Wood and Salt Firing Workshop. Studio Sales Pottery, Michael Carol, Avon, New York.

Teacherメs Assistant. The Mill Art Gallery, Honoyoe Falls, New York.
Taught childrenメs day camp モDrawing in a Natural Environment.ヤ

1997-2000
Work Study Appointments, SUNY New Paltz Art Department. New Paltz, New York.
Metals Department (2000). Monitor of equipment and supply room, in charge of inventory and tool checkout to students.
Sculpture Department (1999). Monitor of equipment and supply room, in charge of inventory and tool checkout to students.
Ceramics Department (1998-1999). Made clay for student use, stocked raw materials, general cleanup and organization of studio.
Photography Department (1997-1998). Monitor of equipment and supply room, in charge of inventory and tool
checkout to students. Mixed and stocked chemicals in color and black and white darkrooms.



2002
Scholarship to attend workshop at Peterメs Valley Craft Center. Layton, New Jersey.

Scholarship to attend workshop at the Womenメs Studio Workshop. Rosendale F, New York.

Ceramic Department Scholarship. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.

Carry Coffing Memorial Scholarship. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.

2000
SUNY New Paltz Alumni Scholarship. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.

Carry Coffing Memorial Scholarship. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.



2007
Strictly Functional, National Juried Exhibition. Lancaster, PA.

Small Works Invitational. The Clay Studio, Philidelphia, PA.

Dinner Plans, a Slow Food Concept-Event. Over the Moon, Floyd, VA.

2006
Annual Tile Festival. Moravian Pottery and Tile Works, Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

From Our Table To Yours. Exhibition, Ferrum College, Ferrum, Virginia.

16 Hands Apprentices. Group Exhibition, Over the Moon Gallery, Floyd, Virginia.

Artizanns Art and Fine Craft Gallery. Naples, New York.

Lost Lake Art and Fine Craft Gallery. Dansville, New York.

2005
Annual Tile Festival. Moravian Pottery and Tile Works, Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

2004
Annual Tile Festival. Moravian Pottery and Tile Works, Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

Eight Fluid Ounces: A Cup Show. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Visiting Artist. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, New York.

2003
Clay Is Not Dirt! Work from the Staff and Apprentices of the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works.
The Medical Healing Arts Center, Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

2002
Finger Lakes Artists Group Exhibition. The Mill Art Gallery, Honoyoe Falls, New York.

Emerging Artists Trio Exhibition. The Living Seed Art Gallery, New Paltz, New York.

B.F.A Thesis Exhibition. Chandler Gallery, SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. New York.

Ceramics Department Exhibition. Smiley Art Gallery, SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. New York.

Ikebana as an art form
Ikebana (ee-kay-bah-nah) is the art of Japanese flower arranging. The object is simply to create something of beauty for the delight of others and, in so doing, improve yourself. The artist sees it as a discipline of the inner spirit for the ultimate purification of the mind and heart. No judging of the work is conducted.
Dating back to the 15th Century, this art form reflects three fundamental characteristics of Japanese thinking: an innate love of nature, an abiding love of line, and an instinctive love of symbolism. For the Japanese, flowers signify communion with the heart of nature.
Through the centuries, ikebana has grown to incorporate 23 leading schools. The first, Ikenobo (15th Century), advocates using the natural bend of branches. This school, together with Sogetsu, Ohara and Misho would be considered the leading schools.
The Sogetsu School has emerged as an exemplary contemporary school whose arrangements fit seamlessly in today's modern and traditional d/cor.
The goal of your arrangement is to create three levels of flowers -- high, medium and low. The highest point should equal twice the width of your container, plus twice the height. The medium level is approximately 3/4 of the highest point, and the lowest point is 3/4 the height of the medium level.
Asymmetry and the use of empty space is an essential feature to composition, so be sure not to clutter the arrangement with too many items.
You can use any type of flower or branch to create your arrangement. But you should never use four of the same flower or branch in a single arrangement.
The tools for the art include a Kenzan (pin frog), Hasami (clippers or scissors without a spring grip), and Hana (fresh flowers). Everything but the fresh flowers are available at Hollow Creek Bonsai. 8KS10

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